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dc.creatorMorgan, Michael
dc.creatorNielsen-Gammon, John
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-28T18:43:04Z
dc.date.available2016-10-28T18:43:04Z
dc.date.issued1998-10-01
dc.identifier.citationMorgan, M. C., and J. W. Nielsen-Gammon, 1998: Using tropopause maps to diagnose midlatitude weather systems. Mon. Wea. Rev., 126, 2555-2579.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/158219
dc.description© Copyright 1998 American Meteorological Society (AMS). Permission to use figures, tables, and brief excerpts from this work in scientific and educational works is hereby granted provided that the source is acknowledged. Any use of material in this work that is determined to be “fair use” under Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Act September 2010 Page 2 or that satisfies the conditions specified in Section 108 of the U.S. Copyright Act (17 USC §108, as revised by P.L. 94-553) does not require the AMS’s permission. Republication, systematic reproduction, posting in electronic form, such as on a web site or in a searchable database, or other uses of this material, except as exempted by the above statement, requires written permission or a license from the AMS. Additional details are provided in the AMS Copyright Policy, available on the AMS Web site located at (https://www.ametsoc.org/) or from the AMS at 617-227-2425 or copyrights@ametsoc.org.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of potential vorticity (PV) allows the efficient description of the dynamics of nearly balanced atmospheric flow phenomena, but the distribution of PV must be simply represented for ease in interpretation. Representations of PV on isentropic or isobaric surfaces can be cumbersome, as analyses of several surfaces spanning the troposphere must be constructed to fully apprehend the complete PV distribution. Following a brief review of the relationship between PV and nearly balanced flows, it is demonstrated that the tropospheric PV has a simple distribution, and as a consequence, an analysis of potential temperature along the dynamic tropopause (here defined as a surface of constant PV) allows for a simple representation of the upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric PV. The construction and interpretation of these tropopause maps, which may be termed “isertelic” analyses of potential temperature, are described. In addition, techniques to construct dynamical representations of the lower-tropospheric PV and near-surface potential temperature, which complement these isertelic analyses, are also suggested. Case studies are presented to illustrate the utility of these techniques in diagnosing phenomena such as cyclogenesis, tropopause folds, the formation of an upper trough, and the effects of latent heat release on the upper and lower troposphere.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.subjectpotential vorticityen_US
dc.titleUsing Tropopause Maps to Diagnose Midlatitude Weather Systemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
local.departmentAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/1520-0493(1998)126<2555:UTMTDM>2.0.CO;2


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