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dc.creatorSolomon, Stuart
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-24T18:38:18Z
dc.date.available2015-06-24T18:38:18Z
dc.date.created2011-05
dc.date.issued2011-05-06
dc.date.submittedMay 2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-9654
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154373
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research project was to determine the overall effects of ibuprofen on bone formation in response to simulated resistance training in adult female rats. Ibuprofen is a common and generally safe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used to treat musculoskeletal pain and inflammation. The focus of this study was to understand how the timing of ibuprofen administration in relation to simulated resistance training (SRT) affects the bone response to the training. Young adult female Sprague Dawley rats (n=15) were acclimated to a purified rat diet for 4 weeks. The animals were split randomly into three groups consisting of placebo before and after training (n=6), ibuprofen before training/placebo after training (n=4) and placebo before training/ibuprofen after training (n=5). Each rat underwent simulated resistance training every other day, for a total of 9 exercise sessions. In vivo bone scans of the proximal and midshaft tibia were taken before and after treatment in both groups by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Data on bone mineral density (BMD) and total area of both the proximal tibia and midshaft tibia were acquired. Serum deoxypyridinoline cross-links (DPD), a specific marker of bone resorption, was measured to evaluate possible resorption activity in response to training and ibuprofen administration. There was no significant difference between groups in total vBMD, cancellous vBMD, and cortical vBMD of the proximal tibia, and no significant difference between groups in total vBMD and total area of the midshaft area of the tibia. However, there was a significant average percent increase in bone density and area in both tibia regions for all groups in response to the simulated resistance training. Serum DPD levels were not significantly different across groups. These preliminary data do not reveal significant effects on bone due to ibuprofen and the timing of its administration nor any differences in resorptive activity, but do illustrate a robust bone response to SRT.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectsprague-dawley
dc.subjectdeoxypyridinaline
dc.subjecttomography
dc.subjectnon-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
dc.subjectibuprofen
dc.subjectsimulated resistance training
dc.subjectbone
dc.titleIMPACT OF IBUPROFEN ON THE BONE RESPONSE TO SIMULATED RESISTANCE TRAINING
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentHealth and Kinesiology
thesis.degree.disciplineNutrition
thesis.degree.grantorHonors and Undergraduate Research
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Science
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBloomfield, Susan
dc.type.materialtext
dc.date.updated2015-06-24T18:38:18Z


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