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dc.creatorGriffin, James M.
dc.creatorTaylor, Lori L.
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T23:07:01Z
dc.date.available2015-02-04T23:07:01Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153188
dc.description.abstractWashington is awash in red ink, and no one seems willing to make the hard choices needed to set our fiscal house aright. Congress’ recent boast of cutting spending by $38 billion makes the problem seem just about solved. On the left, talk of letting the Bush tax cuts expire for those with annual incomes over $250,000 gives the false impression that only very rich taxpayers need sacrifice. And even that timid approach couldn’t get past a lame-duck Congress. On the right, many newly elected Tea Partiers claim that we can simultaneously cut expenditures and taxes. The deficit problem is huge and fixing it will affect us all. Cuts in Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security must be part of any solution. Even with big spending cuts, tax increases are inevitable. Only a return to compromise and sacrifice can secure our fiscal future.en
dc.description.sponsorshipBush School of Government and Public Serviceen
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherThe Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics & Public Policyen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 2;Issue 2
dc.subjectfederal deficiten
dc.titleDeficit Reduction: $38 Billion Won’t Cut Iten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.sponsorBush School of Government and Public Service


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  • The Takeaway
    Policy Briefs from the Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics, and Public Policy

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