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dc.contributor.advisorJepson, Wendy E
dc.creatorHernandez, Manuel
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-04T16:11:26Z
dc.date.available2013-06-04T16:11:26Z
dc.date.created2011-05
dc.date.issued2011-05-06
dc.date.submittedMay 2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-9668
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148796
dc.description.abstractThe lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas is one of the poorest regions with the largest population lacking suitable water supply in the entire United States. The region is characterized by low-income, rural and peri-urban communities called ―colonias.‖ Nearly half of the 238,000 colonia residents face known infrastructure deficiencies in water, sanitation, or both, while nearly one-fifth have unknown water and sanitation status. The commodification of water quality through water vendors has expanded rapidly throughout South Texas, questioning their motives for positioning their businesses in certain locations. We will explore the relationship between poverty and water vending through a spatial analysis using a Geographic Information System. Our analysis revealed significant correlations between demographic variables and water vending unit locations. The spatial distribution was strong in relation to colonia locations, confirming the belief that water companies placed water vending units for the region’s poor communities.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectGeographic Information System
dc.subjectcommodification
dc.subjectLower Rio Grande Valley
dc.subjectcolonias
dc.titleWATER COMMODIFICATION IN THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY, TEXAS
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentGeography
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography
thesis.degree.grantorHonors and Undergraduate Research
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Science
dc.type.materialtext
dc.date.updated2013-06-04T16:11:26Z


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